Current Projects

Realizing the Digital Enterprise 

Solving problems of all sizes

Small-picture solutions use connected infrastructure to make improvements to daily life – such as smart cities that won’t force drivers to idle at a traffic light when there are no other cars at the intersection.

Big-picture solutions leverage the power of smart infrastructure to save resources and lives – such as automatic water valve sensors that divert run-off during storms to prevent flash flooding or sewer overflows.

Current Projects

Janna Johns, an undergraduate UX (user experience) research lab assistant

Undergraduate and graduate students in Purdue University’s Polytechnic Institute presented posters summarizing their 2021-2022 research projects. Student research projects affiliated with the Polytechnic’s Realizing the Digital Enterprise research impact area are summarized here. (Part 2 of 2.)

Students, faculty and staff discuss Purdue Polytechnic research projects in Stewart Center.

Undergraduate and graduate students in Purdue University’s Polytechnic Institute presented posters summarizing their 2021-2022 research projects. Student research projects affiliated with the Polytechnic’s Realizing the Digital Enterprise research impact area are summarized here. (Part 1 of 2.)

Realizing the Digital Enterprise research impact area

Purdue Polytechnic faculty in the “Realizing the Digital Enterprise” research impact area are working to pair technological capability and social responsibility, creating successful cyber–physical experiences.

Gozdem Kilaz

Gozdem Kilaz, associate professor of engineering technology, received Purdue Polytechnic’s Outstanding Faculty in Discovery Award. Much of Kilaz’ research has focused on alternative liquid transportation fuels, including development, testing and approval of biofuels.

Ziyang Tang, a graduate researcher in Purdue Polytechnic’s Department of Computer and Information Technology, and his research team have developed new methods to help computers process images from unmanned aerial systems, recognizing irregularly sized objects like wildfires more quickly and accurately.

Ziyang Tang, a graduate researcher in Purdue Polytechnic’s Department of Computer and Information Technology, and his research team have developed new methods to help computers process images from unmanned aerial systems, recognizing irregularly sized objects like wildfires more quickly and accurately.

A soft, flexible electrode like this, being developed by Purdue Polytechnic’s Robert Nawrocki and colleagues, could be comfortably placed on (or just beneath) the skin, enabling a treatment called deep nerve stimulation. The technology could potentially provide relief for medical disorders including migraine, rheumatoid arthritis and many gastrointestinal illnesses without the side effects of traditional pharmaceutical treatments.

Purdue Polytechnic’s Robert Nawrocki and his research colleagues are designing a soft, flexible electrode that can be comfortably placed on the skin, enabling a treatment called deep nerve stimulation. The new technology could potentially provide relief for medical disorders including migraine, rheumatoid arthritis and many gastrointestinal illnesses without the side effects of traditional pharmaceutical treatments.