Computer and Information Technology

Purdue cybercrime expert named Fulbright Scholar for her work targeting child sex offenders in Spain

Kathryn Seigfried-Spellar, associate professor of computer and information technology, has been selected as a Fulbright Scholar for her work in cybersecurity — specifically, for her upcoming research that will analyze the criminological differences and online grooming strategies of child sexual exploitation offenders in Spain, train Spanish law enforcement officers, and conduct community safety seminars.

Future Work and Learning research projects focus on all human-technology interactions

Since 2018, Purdue Polytechnic faculty have been collaborating to explore the intersection between learning and work within the context of technology. Through new approaches to education and workforce training and development, their ongoing “Future Work and Learning” research aims to empower employees to take charge of their careers and become active, successful professionals and members of society.

CIT researchers develop new “deep learning” methods to fight wildfires with drones

Ziyang Tang, a graduate researcher in Purdue Polytechnic’s Department of Computer and Information Technology, and his research team have developed new methods to help computers process images from unmanned aerial systems, recognizing irregularly sized objects like wildfires more quickly and accurately.

Purdue Polytechnic’s Holistic Safety and Security research projects receive national attention, funding

Since 2018, scientists in Purdue Polytechnic’s strategic research impact areas have been working to solve challenges in cybersecurity and critical infrastructure that affect global economics, security and health. Faculty members in the Holistic Safety and Security team are building on research that has received national attention and funding.

Polytechnic team among finalists in NASA’s Space Robotics Challenge Phase 2

Because of inhospitable living conditions in outer space, some of the galaxy’s next explorers will be robots. To ascertain the caliber of the world’s robotics experts, the Centennial Challenges Program at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) teamed with the Space Center Houston, the official visitor center of NASA’s Johnson Space Center, for the Space Robotics Challenge. A team led by Byung-Cheol “B.C.” Min, associate professor in Purdue Polytechnic’s Department of Computer and Information Technology, is a finalist in NASA’s robotics challenge.

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