sponsored research

Paving the way for skin-compatible sensors for personal health monitoring

Sunghwan Lee, assistant professor of engineering technology, Michael Clevenger, engineering technology graduate student, Hyeonghun Kim, postdoctoral research assistant, and colleagues at the Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science identified a better way to directly fabricate sensors onto ready-made wearable items, such as clothing, gloves, or even disposable masks that can successfully extract bioinformation in real time, with remarkable precision. The research represents an advancement in the development of versatile healthcare devices printed directly onto ready-made clothing that can be worn comfortably by the patient, which ultimately will make these devices more effective.

Future Work and Learning research projects focus on all human-technology interactions

Since 2018, Purdue Polytechnic faculty have been collaborating to explore the intersection between learning and work within the context of technology. Through new approaches to education and workforce training and development, their ongoing “Future Work and Learning” research aims to empower employees to take charge of their careers and become active, successful professionals and members of society.

Purdue Polytechnic’s Holistic Safety and Security research projects receive national attention, funding

Since 2018, scientists in Purdue Polytechnic’s strategic research impact areas have been working to solve challenges in cybersecurity and critical infrastructure that affect global economics, security and health. Faculty members in the Holistic Safety and Security team are building on research that has received national attention and funding.

Nawrocki’s nervous system treatment research awarded Purdue Polytechnic’s first Showalter grant

Purdue Polytechnic’s Robert Nawrocki and his research colleagues are designing a soft, flexible electrode that can be comfortably placed on the skin, enabling a treatment called deep nerve stimulation. The new technology could potentially provide relief for medical disorders including migraine, rheumatoid arthritis and many gastrointestinal illnesses without the side effects of traditional pharmaceutical treatments.

Researchers aim to make conveyor belts smart, able to predict mechanical failure

Jose Garcia Bravo and Brittany Newell, assistant professors of engineering technology, along with Jose Chamorro, Santiago Guevara, Jose Solorio, Laura Vallejo and other colleagues, collaborated to design a system that predicts the health of conveyance systems in industry. Improving the reliability of conveyor belts has the potential to improve efficiencies and reduce costs in a variety of industries.

Zhang investigating BIM technology to automate building code compliance-checking, modular construction

Inspectors check for compliance with building codes during construction projects. Purdue Polytechnic’s Jiansong “Jason” Zhang is researching how to automate code compliance-checking and modular construction by using building information modeling (BIM).

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